Strong contenders amongst Women aged over 40 for Oscar® Glory

 

In a year when there are so many strong female performances in contention for Oscar glory, we are thrilled to see so many women over 40, vying for the top honour. Although we would love to see the Oscar for Best Actress in a Leading Role wing its way to Australia (best of luck to Margot Robbie – I, Tonya), she is up against some strong competition from the more “mature” leading ladies. Who do you think will collect the Oscar on March 4? Let us know in the comments below (for your chance to win a great prize).

Sally Hawkins – The Shape of Water – Age 41

 

 

Playing a mute cleaning woman who protects, and falls for, a mysterious fish/man creature, Sally Hawkins is simply brilliant. In only her second Oscar nomination, playing the character of Elisa, Hawkins had to learn American sign language, and communicate via a range of conveyed emotions – empathy, understanding, love, all with her facial expressions. An outstanding performance in a movie with 13 nominations itself, Sally will be hard to beat.

Frances McDormand – Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri – Age 60

 

 

We’ve come to expect strong performances from Frances McDormand, multiple Oscar nominee, and 1 time winner, and this is no exception. Playing Mildred Hayes, McDormand is a mother obsessed with exacting justice for her murdered daughter, which she does not believe is forthcoming from the police. With strong support from Woody Harrelson, McDormand has swept the pre-season awards (Golden Globes, BAFTA, SAG Awards), and will be a firm favourite.

 

Meryl Streep – The Post – Age 68

 

 

Is there anything Meryl Streep can’t do? In The Post, she plays real-life Washington Post publisher Katharine Graham, who defies a bull-headed White House trying to stifle news about Vietnam. A strong woman going up against a male establishment – how very 2017/18 Hollywood! Filled with self-doubt, Graham overcomes her insecurities and sets the paper on a path where it would later topple the Nixon administration via its Watergate reporting. With 20 prior Oscar nominations, and 3 wins, we can see why the Academy is in love with Meryl.

 

And if you thought the competition was strong in the Best Actress in a Leading Role, have a look at the women vying for the statuette in the Best Supporting Actress category – all are over 40 – what a wonderful achievement, and it’s great to see such strong roles becoming available for women, to showcase their phenomenal abilities. It has meant a first time nomination for 4 of the 5 women nominated in this category! Who is your pick to win? Let us know in the comments section below.

Mary J Blige – Mudbound – Age 47

 

 

Playing the character of Florence Jackson, the matriarch of a sharecropping family, in post WWII Mississippi, Mary J Blige is barely recognisable. Gone is the glamorous persona we are used to, replaced by a look suitable for the wife of a tenant farmer, whose son encounters racism after returning from fighting for his country in WWII. Women who undergo physical transformations have been strong contenders in the past, so this could be Mary’s year.

Allison Janney – I, Tonya – Age 58

 

 

We are more used to seeing Allison Janney on the small screen (think the fabulous C.J. Cregg from the West Wing), however Allison is simply superb as Tonya Harding’s tough-loving mother, LaVona, who brings “pushy mother” to whole new level. Having come from an abusive past herself, LaVona doesn’t understand how to nurture, and sees no other way but to push Tonya to and beyond her limits. Having swept the awards season so far, Allison will be hard to beat.

Lesley Manville – Phantom Thread – Age 61

 

 

We’re sensing a theme here – women taking on a not-always-welcome role in a man’s world. Playing Cyril Woodcock, Lesley is a wonderful no-nonsense character who manages her (perfectionist) brother’s 1950s fashion empire in post-war London. Dressing royalty, movie stars, and grand dames in the distinct style of the House of Woodcock. Lesley is perfect as the contemptuous sister, and deserves her shot at the award.

 

Laurie Metcalf – Lady Bird – Age 62

 

 

Fearing her daughter Lady Bird is about to leave home, Laurie plays Marion McPherson, Lady Bird’s protective and but hypercritical mother. Marion loves her daughter so much and doesn’t want to lose her, that her love comes through as aggression, in this movie about a turbulent mother/daughter relationship, that most of us will relate to, and hope Laurie wins the gong for this alone.

 

Octavia Spencer – The Shape of Water – Age 47

 

 

The only previous Oscar nominee and winner in this category, Octavia Spencer plays Zelda Fuller, cleaning lady in the 1960’s who gets drawn into a plot to rescue an aquatic monster. Sounds fantastical? Maybe, and Octavia provides her character with humanity while she takes on the role of protecting the romance between Sally Hawkins mute character Elisa, and the mystery sea creature. A simply superb performance that has Octavia deservedly on this list.

By now you may (or may not) be wondering why I included the age of each actress next to them? Firstly, because absolutely none of them look anywhere near their actual age, and secondly to show that women really can be fabulous at any age.

 

So, let us know in the comments below, who you think will win the Best Actress in a Leading Role, and Best Supporting Actress, before the Oscars broadcast starts on March 4 (US time). All correct entries/comments will go into the draw to win a fabulous Beauty Pack valued at over $200. You only need to comment below (or on our facebook page), be over 18 years of age, an Australian resident, and non-family member of Beauty Over 40 employees to win.

 

Good luck to all the nominees (including Margot and Saorise), and may the best Woman win!!

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